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Brain Waves

Dr. Patrick Flanagan was a child prodigy in electronics, chemistry, and physics. The Neurophone® was invented in 1958 when he was 14 years old. It is a precision scientific instrument with an extensive digital signal processor that encodes sound and modulates it into ultrasonic signals. He had discovered an entirely new way to transmit sound into the human brain. Patrick’s profound invention has received two United States patents, #3,393,279 and #3,647,970. It took medical science 33 years to discover how the device works.

 

It has been said that great inventions take 50 years before they are understood. In 1991, Martin Lenhardt of the University of Virginia discovered that human beings have the ability to detect ultrasonic sound when it is transmitted through the skin, bones, and liquids of the body. His groundbreaking discovery was published in the prestigious journal Science, Vol. 253, 5, 1991, 82. Lenhardt had duplicated Patrick’s original 1958 Neurophone® using sophisticated ultrasonic transducers and discovered that a tiny organ in the inner ear that is normally associated with balance is also a hearing organ for ultrasonic sound.

 

The organ is called the saccule and is about the size of a pea. It contains nerve endings, called macula, and an otolith, a gelatinous cap containing fine sand-like particles of calcium carbonate called otoconia. When the head is tilted in relation to gravity, the macula signals the vestibulocochlear nerve in the nervous system so that balance can be restored. The saccule has nerve endings that are distributed throughout the brain. Some of these nerves go to the area of the brain that computes sound. Other nerves are distributed into areas concerned with long-term memory.

 

The Neurophone® transmits modulated ultrasonic sound at 40,000 cycles per second (40 kHz). When swimming with dolphins or whales, humans hear ultrasonic energy emitted by these mammals through the saccule. By using the Neurophone®, one may train the brain pathways to “hear” through the saccule pathway. Human ancestors may have possibly communicated with whales and dolphins by the use of ultrasonic sound. When the Neurophone® is used as an experimental listening device, these pathways are developed and appear to expand consciousness balancing the left and right hemispheres of the brain.